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Initially this prompted

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Initially this prompted the foot of a prior London Bridge and was for quite a while called New Fish Street before the intersection was moved upstream. Actually enough the name alluded to the exercises of fishmongers – emptying at Queenhithe and later Billingsgate amid the rule of Edward I – albeit today the location is most nearly connected with Wren's Monument (see overleaf). Until 1831, at the lower end, the churchyard of St Magnus the Martyr framed part of the roadway to the old London Bridge.
A thirteenth-century byway – potentially more established – Fleet Lane would once have keep running down from Old Bailey to Farringdon Ward Without and to the banks of the eponymous stream.
By the late sixteenth century the Fleet was a rank and lethal stream of waste and rottenness and for over 200 years different endeavors were made to enhance the waterway. These were in the end surrendered and what had been a virtual sewer turned into an accepted one when the entire was diverted into pipework, angled over and generally lost to see.
By then what had once been a fundamental lane turned into a back path, with an extended Farringdon Street successfully substituting Fleet Lane for anybody wishing to navigate this side of London. In 1874 the path's utility for activity endured a further blow, cut up by the lines of the London, Chatham and Dover Railway running into the new London Viaduct station, and Fleet Lane was lessened to minimal more than a noteworthy circular drive.
Close-by Farringdon Street is deserving of note, in any case, specifically the site of the Congregational Memorial Hall at No. 8 which was inherent 1872 over London's renowned old Fleet Prison. It merits a notice in any political voyage through focal London, having been the venue of the introduction of the Labor Party (at the Trades Union Congress of 1900) and – inquisitively – of the inaugural meeting of the oppositely contradicted British Union of Fascists under Sir Oswald Mosley. Likewise the regulatory base camp for the 1926 General Strike, the fiercely gothic lobby was tragically devastated in 1969.